All Posts in Category

Skeletal

Rheumatoid Arthritis, Co-Morbidities and Exercise

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized as a multisystem inflammatory condition, which affects 1% of the population.1 The condition is further complicated by co-morbid diseases which includes cognitive dysfunction, cardiovascular disease, fatigue, and depression.1(1)2 As an aggregate, such illnesses can systematically diminish an individual’s health and quality of life. Thus, it is imperative to consider interventions,…

Restricted Ankle Joint Dorsiflexion: Interventions

In a previous discussion, I explored the general benefits of warm-ups and their relationships to performance enhancement. Stiff joints and restricted flexibility hinder full expressions of motions, movement patterns, and movement economy. Warm-ups can help circumvent these problems (Fradkin, Zazryn, & Smoliga, 2010). In order to more deeply appreciate the application and interventions of exercises…

Evidence-Based Practice and Low Back Pain

Understanding the utility and efficaciousness of evidence-based practice (EBP) is a vital first step in ensuring safe and effective outcomes with my clientele. In the following sections, I would like to provide an example of EBP, the findings I have used, and how it has helped me successfully re-strengthen clients with low back pain. For…

Tracking Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by compromised bone strength and elevated bone turnover, which increases an individual’s risk of fracture (Srivastava et al., 2005). Almost 44 million Americans are estimated to have low bone mass which, in 2001, had a direct national expenditure of 17 billion dollars (Srivastava et al., 2005). As such, methods of…

What is Functional Exercise?

It could be argued that one first ask the purpose of an exercise. If we wish to teach individuals exercise, which enhances their ability to perform activities of daily living, for example, it would seem reasonable to implement those exercises, which acknowledges the aforementioned outcome goal. Pushing objects, dynamically or statically, could be seen as…

More On Upper Crossed Syndrome

In Janda’s upper crossed syndrome (UCS), we will notice relationship; there is a crossedrelationship between the upper anterior and posterior regions of the body. The pectoralis major and minor are facilitated on the anterior side, as well as the upper trapezius and levator scapulae on the posterior side. Conversely, the deep cervical flexors of the…

Reflections

Motor learning and motor control theory have been topics espoused by other medical and exercise professionals which I studied from (i.e., Mike Boyle, Brett Jones, Gray Cook, Stuart McGill, Charlie Weingroff) since approximately 2009. Initially, such concepts were foreign. However as time passed (i.e., as well as studying said concepts through ATSU), I slowly began…

Vladimir Janda and Movement Assessments

Movement assessments are intended to capture multiple muscle groups and joint actions, in addition to assessing the coordination of prime movers, synergists, and stabilizers (Page, Lardner, & Frank, 2010). They are also designed to break down the body into smaller “sections” by way of multiple, and smaller, movement patterns. Such an approach provides an opportunity…